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Chicago 17th edition footnotes and bibliography

Footnotes and Bibliography for the Chicago Manual of Style 17th edition

Citing journal articles

In a footnote, cite specific page numbers. In the bibliography, include the page range for the whole article. For articles consulted online, include a URL or the name of the database. Many journal articles list a DOI (Digital Object Identifier). A DOI forms a permanent URL that begins https://doi.org/. This URL is preferable to the URL that appears in your browser’s address bar.

The title of the journal is italicised. 

Journal article

Elements of citation

Author -- Title in inverted commas -- Journal title -- Volume, issue, year (in brackets) -- Page number(s) -- URL (if consulted online)

Footnote

9. Kriston Rennie, "The normative character of monastic exemption in the early medieval Latin west," Medieval Worlds 6 (2017): 71, https://doi:10.1553/medievalworlds_no6_2017s61.

Bibliography

Rennie, Kriston. "The normative character of monastic exemption in the early medieval Latin west." Medieval Worlds 6 (2017): 61-77. https://doi:10.1553/medievalworlds_no6_2017s61.

Endnote reference type

When citing a journal article in print use "Journal Article"

When citing a journal article consulted online or from a database use "Electronic Article"

More than one author

Elements of citation

Journal articles often list many authors. If there are four or more authors, list up to ten in the bibliography; in a note, list only the first, followed by et al. (“and others”). For more than ten authors, list the first seven in the bibliography, followed by et al.

Footnote

10. Martin Crotty, and Craig Stockings, "The Minefield of Australian Military History," Australian Journal of Politics and History 60, no. 4 (2014): 581.

Bibliography

Crotty, Martin, and Craig Stockings. "The Minefield of Australian Military History." Australian Journal of Politics and History 60, no. 4 (2014): 580-91.

Endnote reference type

When citing a journal article in print use "Journal Article"

When citing a journal article consulted online or from a database use "Electronic Article"

Ensure you place authors on separate lines

Subsequent citations

Elements of citation

Subsequent citations of sources already given in full, either in a previous note or in a bibliography that provides complete bibliographic data, should be shortened whenever possible.

The most common short form consists of the last name of the author and the main title of the work cited, usually shortened if more than four words

Long citation

Lisa Featherstone, "‘That's What Being a Woman Is For’: Opposition to Marital Rape Law Reform in Late Twentieth‚ÄźCentury Australia," Gender and History 29, no. 1 (2017): 99.

Shortened citation

Featherstone, ‘That's What Being a Woman Is For,’ 94.